Different criteria may require different values to prioritize the issues. For this matter, when you create a criterion, you need to set scores that your team will use to evaluate it.

There are four options to choose from:

  • Positive
  • Range
  • Series
  • Percent

Positive

With this option, you can assign any positive whole number from 0 to infinity (in fact, to 400 billion). You can't use negative numbers with this score option.

Range

With this option, you restrict numbers from and to. You can use both positive and negative numbers. For example, you set a range from -4 to 4 or from 5 to 15. You will be able to assign any whole number from that interval.

Series

With this option, you choose specific numbers your team will be able to assign. They can be both positive and negative whole numbers. Simply specify the numbers separated by a comma.

Some of the numerical sequences you could use:

Fibonacci numbers — 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8

Mersenne primes — 2, 3, 5, 7, 13, 17 or 3, 7, 31, 127

Exponential sequence — 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32

Triangular numbers — 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15

Square numbers — 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25

Pentagonal numbers — 1, 5, 12, 22, 35, 51

Percent

With this option, you can assign any positive whole number from 0 to 100, which will be treated as a percent. That is, the resulting criterion score will be divided by 100.

Presets

Give a try to our presets if you don't know which option is best:

  • Fist of Five (FoF) - range from 0 to 5
  • Fibonacci - series 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8
  • Powers of 2 - series 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16

Tips

We do advise you to specify what each score means in the criterion description. This helps to understand the criterion and scores better and accelerates the evaluation in general. Also, poor criterion description may be the reason for the alignment to appear low because the users understand it in their own way.

Score description allows you to use the MoSCoW method, T-shirt Sizing, or halves, as well. For example:

1. Range 0 - 3, using the MoSCoW method.

  • 0 = Won't
  • 1 = Could
  • 2 = Should
  • 3 = Must

2. Series 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, using the T-shirt Sizing.

  • 1 = XS
  • 2 = S
  • 4 = M
  • 8 = L
  • 16 = XL

3) Range 0 - 7, using halves

  • 0 = 0
  • 1 = 0.5
  • 2 = 1
  • 3 = 1.5
  • 4 = 2
  • 5 = 2.5
  • 6 = 3
  • 7 = 3.5
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